Here you will find informative articles about home and business alarm & security systems.

To Our Valued Customers Concerning the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak

3/12/2020

Coronavirus

There is no higher priority to our entire Prudential Alarm Family than the safety of our customers and employees. We are in contact with medical professionals and are monitoring the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website, the World Health Organization (WHO) website, and government agency websites to stay on top of this evolving situation. We are making sure that our employees are practicing the proper steps as outlined by the CDC to protect themselvs from both contracting or spreading the virus, with a strict rule to stay home from duty if displaying any cold or flu symptoms. 

We want you to feel confident while Prudential Alarm protects your home or establishment. As the concern continues to grow for the Coronavirus, we want you all to rest assured that we always take the necessary precautions to establish cleaning and sanitizing practices throughout each business day. Our installation personnel and staff clean and sanitize all surfaces, door handles, work stations, computers, etc., that they come in contact with. As always, we are committed to upholding the highest standard of cleanliness by continuing to work closely with Ecolab, a global leader in cleaning products. Ecolab has shared best practices and the latest products that may be useful to combat the spread of COVID-19. As we continue to monitor developments and navigate through these challenging circumstances, we want you to know that you can rely on us always to put your health and safety first.

How long can the virus last on surfaces? Current evidence suggests that coronavirus may remain viable for hours to days on surfaces made from a variety of materials.

How is the virus transmitted? Transmission of the virus occurs much more commonly through respiratory droplets than through clothes, utensils, or furniture.

What can we all do to prevent the spread of illness? Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with people who are sick, or those who you may suspect are sick due to coughing or sneezing. Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow. Throw used tissues in the trash, then immediately wash your face and hands with soap or sanitizer. Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily.

Learn more about limiting illness directly from the CDC: https://bit.ly/2IDtwIE

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Prudential Alarm December Employee of the Month Tony Divito

1/8/2020

Prudential Alarm December Employee of the Month - Tony DivitoPictured right is our December Employee of the Month from our Alarm division Tony Divito and on the left is his supervisor, Jay Bassin.  Tony is one of our highly skilled security technicians at Prudential Alarm. He continually goes above and beyond in ensuring the physical plant security for many of our premier accounts. Tony installs both mechanical and electronic security systems to ensure the safety of our clients' facilities and personnel. He rarely misses a day, is never late, and will do whatever job we need him to and whenever we need it. Tony, thank you for your work ethic. We appreciate you. Congratulations on receiving this prestigious award.

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Halloween Safety Tips

10/20/2019

Prudential Alarm wishes everyone a safe and spooky holiday!One of the most exciting times of the year for your kids is Halloween, and to help parents provide a safe experience, here are some Halloween safety tips: 

CHECKING CANDY AND TREATS:

  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. 
  • Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any of the following candies that have:
  •  An unusual appearance or discoloration
  • Tiny pinholes or tears in wrappers 
  • Spoiled or unwrapped items
  • Homemade items or baked goods should be discarded unless you personally know who gave them. 
  • When in doubt, throw it out
  • Tell children not to accept -- and, especially, not to eat--anything that isn't commercially wrapped.
  • Parents of young children should also remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies and small toys. 
  • Try to apportion treats for the days following Halloween. 
  • Although sharing is encouraged, make sure items that can cause choking
  • (such as hard candies), are given only to those of an appropriate age.

ALL DRESSED UP:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes. Makeup should be tested ahead of time on a small patch of skin to ensure there are no unpleasant surprises on the big day.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant.
  • If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child's costume, make sure it is not sharp or long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  • Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional. While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as "one size fits all," or "no need to see an eye specialist," obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal. This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss.
  • Review with children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they ever have an emergency or become lost.

CARVING A NICHE: 

  • Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.
  • Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and not on a porch or any path where visitors may pass close by. They should never be left unattended. 

HOME SAFE HOME:

  • To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.
  • Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.
  • Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.
  • Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater. 

ON THE TRICK-OR-TREAT TRAIL:

  • A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children on their neighborhood rounds.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.
  • If your older children are going alone, plan and review the route that is acceptable to you. Agree on a specific time when they should return home.
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.
  • Because pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween, remind Trick-or-Treaters:
  • Stay in a group and communicate where they will be going.
  • Remember reflective tape for costumes and trick-or-treat bags.
  • Carry a cellphone for quick communication.
  • Remain on well-lit streets and always use the sidewalk.
  • If no sidewalk is available, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.
  • Never cut across yards or use alleys.
  • Only cross the street as a group in established crosswalks (as recognized by local custom). Never cross between parked cars or out driveways.
  • Don't assume the right of way. Motorists may have trouble seeing Trick-or-Treaters. Just because one car stops, doesn't mean others will!
  • Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity.

HEALTHY HALLOWEEN:

  • A good meal prior to parties and trick-or-treating will discourage youngsters from filling up on Halloween treats.
  • Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils.
  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Try to ration treats for the days and weeks following Halloween.

 

©2017 American Academy of Pediatrics

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